Leadership Development goes to Church

Hope you enjoy this latest article, posted today on LinkedIn.

After wrapping up 20+ years in corporate leadership, I became an intern at a local church. I had led in many areas of my life, but not within a church. During my internship I discovered a lot about myself and certainly strengthened my relationship with God. My practical take-away was this – churches suffer from the same leadership issues that companies do. And I wanted to do something about it.

Many churches have leadership programs that attract people of all ages who want to serve well in ministry. What often happens is that the programs are built around ministry work. Showing up at all hours, getting the administrative work of the church accomplished, as well as the physical aspects of making church services happen. Sounds vaguely like a corporate job too?

In corporate America, we offer a lot of training that helps us engage employees, identify leaders, and manage good and bad conflict within our teams. In churches today, much less time is spent on this type of training (if any). What are the long term impacts? In either setting, if you praise managers and elevate work, you attract workers, managers, and administrators. You are less likely to retain or attract leaders, problem-solvers and visionaries.

The fact is, work is not relationship. It’s work. And without a balance between the two, the leadership program is at best, a management program. At its worst, it is a work detail.

I believe that leading well in corporations is important for our time on earth, but leading well in ministry has an eternal significance. I want to partner with churches that are seeking long-term leadership strategies. It’s not as easy as getting the work done, that’s true. But there is a longer term benefit – growing and attracting leaders who want to improve on what you’re doing today. Men and women who want to be developed, so they can in turn, develop others. I see it very clearly when I look at Ephesians 4. Each person needs to gain clarity of purpose, so they can perform their function properly within the body of Christ.

Interested in building a custom strategy for your leaders or your staff? Check out some of the practical, sample reporting available by clicking this link. I look forward to hearing your goals and working with you to achieve them!

One Reply to “Leadership Development goes to Church”

  1. “The fact is, work is not relationship. It’s work. And without a balance between the two, the leadership program is at best, a management program. At its worst, it is a work detail.” Truth!!

    Like

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